Bathroom Fan Soffit Vent

Bathroom Fan Soffit Vent

I am looking for some clarification. I have been reading about installing an exhaust fan in a bathroom, and I have been reading that you should always vent to the outside, but I continue to read that you should never vent through the soffit. I am not really sure what this means. Do they mean that you should not put the vent up to the soffit and hopes that it will go out, or do they mean that you should not even use a Soffit Vent designed for this. I keep seeming devices like these Bathroom soffit vents and these which appear to be vents that get installed into the soffit, and then allow you to vent directly to the outside.
bathroom fan soffit vent 1

Bathroom Fan Soffit Vent

I am looking for some clarification. I have been reading about installing an exhaust fan in a bathroom, and I have been reading that you should always vent to the outside, but I continue to read that you should never vent through the soffit. I am not really sure what this means. Do they mean that you should not put the vent up to the soffit and hopes that it will go out, or do they mean that you should not even use a Soffit Vent designed for this. I keep seeming devices like these Bathroom soffit vents and these which appear to be vents that get installed into the soffit, and then allow you to vent directly to the outside. These devices seem like they would work, are these devices acceptable?
bathroom fan soffit vent 2

Bathroom Fan Soffit Vent

Bob Jackson July 10, 2016 at 2:03 pm # 12 feet of bathroom fan duct isn’t excessive under normal conditions, e.g. the correctly sized duct, gentle turns with no kinks and pinches. > The soffit has holes in it, so I do not have a separate round soffit vent. If you have ventilated soffit panels (the type with lot’s of small holes) and the end of the fan duct is taped, stapled or screwed to the inside of the soffit then that’s the problem. The small holes in vented soffit are mostly blocking the airflow. You should install a proper soffit vent for the fan. Also check the condition and layout of the exhaust duct in the attic for any problems. Reply
bathroom fan soffit vent 3

Bathroom Fan Soffit Vent

12 feet of bathroom fan duct isn’t excessive under normal conditions, e.g. the correctly sized duct, gentle turns with no kinks and pinches. > The soffit has holes in it, so I do not have a separate round soffit vent. If you have ventilated soffit panels (the type with lot’s of small holes) and the end of the fan duct is taped, stapled or screwed to the inside of the soffit then that’s the problem. The small holes in vented soffit are mostly blocking the airflow. You should install a proper soffit vent for the fan. Also check the condition and layout of the exhaust duct in the attic for any problems. Reply
bathroom fan soffit vent 4

Bathroom Fan Soffit Vent

> The soffit has holes in it, so I do not have a separate round soffit vent. If you have ventilated soffit panels (the type with lot’s of small holes) and the end of the fan duct is taped, stapled or screwed to the inside of the soffit then that’s the problem. The small holes in vented soffit are mostly blocking the airflow. You should install a proper soffit vent for the fan.
bathroom fan soffit vent 5

Bathroom Fan Soffit Vent

I have a soffit ventilated bathroom exhaust fan that doesn’t seem to be venting the moist air out of the bathroom. I am having problems with paint peeling in the bathroom. The distance from the fan to where the vent pipe attaches to the soffit is about 12 feet. The sofit has holes in it, so I do not have a separate round soffit vent. Is it possible that the vent pipe is plugged? Or is the distance it is pushing air to the vent too long? I have the same set up in another bathroom, but it is closer to the soffit (about 6-7 ft) and there isn’t any problem with paint peeling.
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Bathroom Fan Soffit Vent

Tom July 10, 2016 at 10:46 am # I have a soffit ventilated bathroom exhaust fan that doesn’t seem to be venting the moist air out of the bathroom. I am having problems with paint peeling in the bathroom. The distance from the fan to where the vent pipe attaches to the soffit is about 12 feet. The sofit has holes in it, so I do not have a separate round soffit vent. Is it possible that the vent pipe is plugged? Or is the distance it is pushing air to the vent too long? I have the same set up in another bathroom, but it is closer to the soffit (about 6-7 ft) and there isn’t any problem with paint peeling. Thanks for your input. Reply
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Bathroom Fan Soffit Vent

I have a soffit ventilated bathroom exhaust fan that doesn’t seem to be venting the moist air out of the bathroom. I am having problems with paint peeling in the bathroom. The distance from the fan to where the vent pipe attaches to the soffit is about 12 feet. The sofit has holes in it, so I do not have a separate round soffit vent. Is it possible that the vent pipe is plugged? Or is the distance it is pushing air to the vent too long? I have the same set up in another bathroom, but it is closer to the soffit (about 6-7 ft) and there isn’t any problem with paint peeling. Thanks for your input. Reply
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Step One // How to Install a Bathroom Vent Fan Bath Vent Overview Photo by Keller & Keller Photography A bathroom without a ventilation fan is like a fireplace without a chimney: If you fail to pull the moisture generated in the bathroom out of there, it will migrate into the walls and grow mold and mildew, or blister paint and peel wallpaper. One reason many households still don’t have bath fans is that they can be intimidating to install. That’s why we asked This Old House general contractor Tom Silva to show us how. The bathroom here is below an accessible attic, so Tom ran the exhaust duct across the attic and out a gable end. Bath vent fans are rated by how many cubic feet of air they can move in one minute, known as the CFM rating. To determine which size fan to buy for your bath, multiply the room’s square footage by 1.1. For example, a 100-square-foot bath would require a 110 CFM-rated fan. Fan’ also have a sound rating, measured in sones. (A modern refrigerator operates at about one sone.) Vent fans range from as low as 0.5 sone up to about 6.0 sones. You’ll find both the CFM and sone ratings printed on the vent fan’s box.
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Bob Jackson January 11, 2016 at 6:54 pm # Which “these” do you have installed on your house? The directional soffit vent with louvers? Is the soffit vent oriented so the air blows away from the house? How strong is the airflow from the vent fan? (I can feel the air blowing on my hand from 4 feet away.) Too long, undersized or loose duct connections can degrade the bathroom fan performance such that the air weakly wafts out the exhaust vent allowing it to get pulled into the attic vents instead of blowing well away from the house. I’m also wondering how the installer routed the exhaust fan duct through the AccuVent panels. Wouldn’t be surprised if the duct is constricted or knocked loose. You can send photos to bobhandymanhowto.com replace the with the @ symbol. Thanks, Bob Reply
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Which “these” do you have installed on your house? The directional soffit vent with louvers? Is the soffit vent oriented so the air blows away from the house? How strong is the airflow from the vent fan? (I can feel the air blowing on my hand from 4 feet away.) Too long, undersized or loose duct connections can degrade the bathroom fan performance such that the air weakly wafts out the exhaust vent allowing it to get pulled into the attic vents instead of blowing well away from the house. I’m also wondering how the installer routed the exhaust fan duct through the AccuVent panels. Wouldn’t be surprised if the duct is constricted or knocked loose. You can send photos to bobhandymanhowto.com replace the with the @ symbol. Thanks, Bob Reply
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Step Two // How to Install a Bathroom Vent Fan Drill a Reference Hole Photo by Keller & Keller Photography Draw a mark on the bathroom ceiling where you’d like to install the vent fan. For optimum performance, locate it between the shower and the toilet. Use an extra-long, 3/8-inch-diameter spade bit to bore a reference hole through the ceiling and into the attic. Climb into the attic and clear away any insulation from around the hole. Now use the reference hole to determine the exact position of the fan. Measure the vent fan housing. Try to position the vent fan directly between two joists near your reference hole. Take into account any nearby pipes or other obstructions. Note the final position of the vent fan in relation to the reference hole.